Tanner Adell Shares the Moment She Knew She Had to Make a Country Version of Beyoncé’s ‘Drunk in Love’ (Exclusive)

Published by Cel Manero from Global One Media, Inc.

The singer known for “Buckle Bunny” recorded a fresh rendition of the hit song exclusively for Apple Music.

Tanner Adell, like millions of Beyoncé fans, found inspiration in Beyoncé’s 2018 Coachella performance, particularly realizing that “Drunk in Love” could be reimagined as a country song. When the opportunity arose to record it for Apple Music Nashville Sessions: Beyoncé Covered, Adell eagerly seized the chance. Alongside Brittney Spencer, Tiera Kennedy, and Reyna Roberts, Adell contributed to the special collection of Beyoncé covers by emerging Black country artists. In an exclusive interview with PEOPLE in Nashville, Adell shared how Beyoncé’s “Beychella” performance sparked her love for “Drunk in Love,” which she had kept in mind until the right moment came for her to create her version.

Despite some skepticism about whether “Drunk in Love” would fit the country genre, Tanner Adell and her fellow musicians were confident in their adaptation. They incorporated a pedal steel guitar to give Beyoncé’s iconic opening a country twist, adding guitar riffs that Adell describes as distinctly country. Reflecting on the song’s theme, Adell notes the commonality of country songs about being drunk, making the adaptation feel natural.

Adell, along with Tiera Kennedy, Brittney Spencer, and Reyna Roberts, also collaborated on “Blackbiird,” a cover of the Beatles’ 1968 song. This recording holds personal significance for Adell, as it’s

Despite some skepticism about whether “Drunk in Love” would fit the country genre, Tanner Adell and her fellow musicians were confident in their adaptation. They incorporated a pedal steel guitar to give Beyoncé’s iconic opening a country twist, adding guitar riffs that Adell describes as distinctly country. Reflecting on the song’s theme, Adell notes the commonality of country songs about being drunk, making the adaptation feel natural.

Adell, along with Tiera Kennedy, Brittney Spencer, and Reyna Roberts, also collaborated on “Blackbiird,” a cover of the Beatles’ 1968 song. This recording holds personal significance for Adell, as it’s her father’s favorite track. She sees Beyoncé’s decision to feature “Blackbiird” prominently on Cowboy Carter as a strong endorsement of their work, signaling support for women in country music.

Adell humorously likened Beyoncé’s support to a maternal embrace, suggesting it validates their presence in the genre.